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Smaller apartments don’t mean lower quality: Tony Trobe interviews Rebecca Stockley

Tony Trobe interviews on the strengths and weaknesses of small apartments. Photo: Melissa AdamsTony Trobe talks to Rebecca Stockley, ACT Planning Institute of Australia committee member, about apartment design.
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TT: Recently there has been heated debate about the inconsistent quality of apartment design. Is this a planning issue?

RS: Planning is inherently concerned with the quality of the environment and the manner in which people interact with it. Housing is fundamental to the quality of that interaction. It is therefore reasonable the planning system seeks to promote an acceptable quality in all housing developments, including apartments.

TT: Is the plethora of very small apartments now on the market a reflection of a race to the bottom?

RS: You have to distinguish between the size of the apartment and the quality of that apartment, in terms of both internal design and construction quality. Construction quality is ultimately a question for building certifiers, so I won’t comment on that.

The rate of delivery of smaller apartments in recent years should be considered against market demand, housing diversity and housing affordability. Ultimately, developers will build whatever sells. For a variety of reasons the investor market has been very strong in recent years and smaller apartments appeal to that market. Historically, housing delivery has been heavily skewed towards detached housing on larger blocks. This no longer marries with demographic patterns, while housing affordability is a deepening issue. The delivery of a higher proportion of smaller housing topologies, including apartments, reflects this.

I don’t think it is helpful to criticise small apartments per se.  However, I think there are opportunities to increase the design quality of small apartments, to improve the way they function, and to address some of the less obvious design features that contribute to a quality environment.

TT: In overseas markets,is there a bigger range of innovative housing topologies with small or very small footprints?

RS: Yes, but that also reflects pressures associated with land availability and cost. The Territory Plan goes some way to mediate ACT community expectations with potential future innovations in design by specifying minimum dwelling floor areas, which exclude balconies and car parking facilities, but also providing the opportunity for the decision maker to consider the details of the internal layout (including functional living spaces, flexibility in furniture layout, adequate storage and service areas, and the availability of shared facilities) when considering designs that do not meet the minimum dwelling floor thresholds.

This approach is sensible in most instances, but could benefit from clearer recognition of the value in innovation and design excellence, irrespective of apartment size. At present there is no detailed guidance to assist the developer or decision maker when considering what might not be an appropriate design, nor does it highlight what design attributes the community might value, or be willing to trade off for other attributes, such as a high level of accessibility to services or sustainability.

TT: Are we dragging the chain compared to other jurisdictions dealing with the similar issues?

RS: In early 2015, Victoria commenced work towards a Better Apartment Design framework. As part of that discussion, industry demonstrated you could achieve high quality and flexible design within small spaces; consequently the government appears to have stepped away from the idea of minimum apartment sizes. However, there is likely to be stronger guidance on the less tangible aspects of good dwelling design, including access to natural light and ventilation, ceiling heights, noise and adaptability, that will improve a person’s enjoyment of their living environment over the longer term.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

 

MARDI GRAS SYDNEY: A look at the historyPhotos

MARDI GRAS SYDNEY: A look at the history | Photos 2016: Brendan Spratt, a performer Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras rehearses his routines. Photo: COLE BENNETTS
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1978: Protesters take part in the 1978 protest that would evolve into the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras. Photo SMH

1978: The scene outside of the Central Court of Petty Session in Sydney

1980s: An image from a parade in the 1980s

1986: Oxford Street celebrates the gay and lesbian mardi gras. Photo FAIRFAX ARCHIVE, SMH

1988: Parade spectators climb atop Oxford St shop awnings to watch the parade. Photo: GARY MCLEAN / FAIRFAX ARCHIVES

1998: Drag queens dressed as ‘The Bond Girls’ during the 20th Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras parade in Sydney. Photo: TORSTEN BLACKWOOD / AFP / GETTY IMAGES

1999: The 22nd Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras parade. Photo: TORSTEN BLACKWOOD / AFP / Getty Images

1999: Vanessa Wagner performed during the festival at the Seymour Theatre.

2001: Australian gays perform Mardi Gras dances during the Centenary of Federation parade through the streets of Sydney. Photo: TORSTEN BLACKWOOD / AFP / Getty Images

2001: Australian politician Phillip Ruddock and Australian Prime Minister John Howardcome under scrutiny by having cutouts of their faces displayed. Photo: NICK LAHAM

2002: Spectators at the parade. Photo: PATRICK RIVIERE

2004: An image from the annual parade. Photo JON BUCKLE

2004: An image from the annual parade. Photo JON BUCKLE

2005: Parade Goers dressed as Prince Charles and Camilla pose for photographers. Photo: CHRIS MCGRATH / GETTY IMAGES

2006: Mardi Gras parade

2007: The bring david hicks home float. Photo: JAMES BRICKWOOD

2009: This pic shows Lardonna Rama. Photo: JAME ALCOCK

2010: Parade goers dancing in Oxford Street

2011: Launch of new Sydney mardi gras promotional logo. Photo: Robert McGrath.

2011. Photo: GLEN DRAPER

2012: Kylie Minogue greets the dancers after watching a tribute performance in her honour in Taylor Square during the Mardi Gras parade in Sydney. Photo: JANIE BARRETT

2013: Revellers enjoy the Mardi Gras in Sydney. Photo: JAMES ALCOCK

2014: ANZ dressed up some of their ATM’s around Sydney for Mardi Gras. Photo: SASHA WOOLEY

2015. Jessica Mauboy performs during Mardi Gras Party at the Entertainment Quarter. Photo: DON ARNOLD

2015: Australian Defence Force members and supporters march in the 2015 Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras parade

2015: Participants and party goers at the Mardi Gras. Photo: JAME ALCOCK

2015: Sydney lord mayor Clover Moore flies the flag at this year’s Mardi Gras parade. Photo: JAMES ALCOCK

TweetFacebookPHOTOS: 2014 Mega GalleryPHOTOS: A look back in time at the 2002 Mardi Gras2013:Mardi Gras still breaks down barriers after 35 yearsEverybody loves a parade, and the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras is one of the biggest and best, not only in Australia, but in the world.

From humble beginnings back in June 24, 1978, what was once a small scale protest and statement of pride and self-expressionis now a major mainstream national icon that is internationally respected as a celebration of diversity and inclusion.

As revelers gear up for Saturday’s 2016 Mardi Gras parade in Sydney we take a look at the event that started in confrontation back in 1978.

The first march took place on Saturday, June 241978 at 10pm. The march wasmet with unexpected police violence after 53 men and women were violently arrested by police.

Up to 3,000 people marched in an incident-free parade in 1979 after the NSW governmentrepealed the NSW Summary Offences Act legislation that had allowed the arrests to be made and created a new Public Assemblies Act which meant that Sydneysiders no longer had to apply for a permit to have a demonstration. They just had to notify police.

In 1980 a key new element was introduced – the post-parade party. In 1981 the decision was taken to move the event forward to summer to enjoy better weather.

The estimates for the parade audiences show it doubling every year till it reached 50,000 in 1984.

The event began to enjoy extensive media coverage from the mid-80s onwards and the crowds continued to swell, from 200,000 in 1989 to over 500,000 in 1993.

Large numbers of interstate and international travellers had started flying in for the event as well, generating an estimated $38 million for the NSW economy.

Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras remains the one truly global gay annual event and a uniquely attractive escape from the Northern Hemisphere winter.

– source: mardigras.org419论坛.

 

2016 Clipsal 500 Adelaide: Scott Pye to start opening race from polePhotos

2016 Clipsal 500 Adelaide: Scott Pye to start opening race from pole | Photos Chaz Mostert, driver of the #55 Supercheap Auto Racing Ford, celebrates after taking pole position for race two after qualifying session two for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4. Pictures: GETTY IMAGES
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Jason Bright drives the #8 Team BOC Holden during qualifying session two for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500. Pictures: GETTY IMAGES

Chaz Mostert, driver of the #55 Supercheap Auto Racing Ford, celebrates after taking pole position for race two after qualifying session two for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Mark Winterbottom drives the #1 The Bottle-O Racing Ford during qualifying session two for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500.

Chaz Mostert drives the #55 Supercheap Auto Racing Ford during qualifying session two for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500.

Craig Lowndes, driver of the #888 Team Vortex Holden, sits in his car prior to qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Craig Lowndes drives the #888 Team Vortex Holden during qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500.

Chaz Mostert drives the #55 Supercheap Auto Racing Ford during qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500.

Scott McLaughlin, driver of the #33 Wilson Security Racing GRM Volvo, sits in his car prior to qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Jamie Whincup, driver of the #88 Red Bull Racing Australia Holden, prepares for qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Craig Lowndes, driver of the #888 Team Vortex Holden, speaks with his engineer Ludo Lacroix after qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Chaz Mostert, driver of the #55 Supercheap Auto Racing Ford, is seen prior to qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Scott McLaughlin, driver of the #33 Wilson Security Racing GRM Volvo, is seen after qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Scott Pye, driver of the #17 DJR Team Penske Ford, celebrates after taking pole position for race one after qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Scott Pye, driver of the #17 DJR Team Penske Ford, celebrates after taking pole position for race one after qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Scott Pye, driver of the #17 DJR Team Penske Ford, celebrates after taking pole position for race one after qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4. Pictures: GETTY IMAGES

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4. Pictures: GETTY IMAGES

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

TweetFacebookScott Pye has stunned the V8 Supercars field to snatch pole position for the opening race at the Clipsal 500.

The No.17 Falcon has edged out Jamie Whincup by less than a tenth a second and will lead the field in Saturday’s first race of the season.

The pole is Pye’s first in 106 races in the category, and gives a first pole to DJR Team Penske since joining the series at last year’s Clipsal 500.

With new teammate Fabian Coulthard, Pye had endured an off-season in transition as his team expanded to field two cars this year.

The hard work appears to have paid off, with the Roger Penske-backed outfit looking set to compete hard in 2016.

Pye’s garage were euphoric at the result, and the 26-year-old pumped his fists to the Adelaide crowd on Friday after climbing from his Falcon.

“It’s a big relief after a massive off-season,” he said.

This time 12 months ago, DJR Team Penske debuted returning champion Marcos Ambrose in the No.17 Falcon but the Tasmanian didn’t last another race before giving up his drive to Pye.

Team president Tim Cindric said it was a reward for the hard work of both the driver and his engineering team.

“It’s a great start for the season … obviously, we have a lot of work to do,” he said.

“It shows we’re in a better place than we started last year and, hopefully, we can build on it.”

The second row of the grid will be filled by Scott McLaughlin, who was quickest in both practice sessions on Friday, with series champion Mark Winterbottom fourth.

The Sydney Morning Herald

 

NRL 2016: Action from Round 1 – Thursday, FridayPhotos, Video

NRL 2016: Action from Round 1 – Thursday, Friday | Photos, Video Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE
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Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

TweetFacebookThe NRL season kicked off on Thursday, March 3, with a game between the Parramatta Eels and the Brisbane Broncos.

The Broncos took home the points with a 17 to 4 win over the Eels.

The first round of 2016 continued on Friday night when the Canterbury Bulldogs took on the Manly Sea Eagles.

It was the Bulldogs who took the victory with a 28 to 6 win over the Sea Eagles.

 

Cardinal George Pell says resigning would be an admission of guilt

Cardinal George Pell reads a statement after meeting with abuse survivors in Rome this week. Photo: Marco Di Lauro Cardinal George Pell giving evidence via video link from Rome.
Nanjing Night Net

Unheard survivors reach out en masse’We met as people from Ballarat’Comment: Pell must resign, or Pope should actBackflip on Cardinal a Bolt from the blueCardinal Pell in his own words

Cardinal George Pell has welled up in a live interview from Rome when talking about a victim of sexual abuse by a paedophile priest, but said he would not resign over the issue.

Andrew Bolt is in Rome as a ‘Sky News contributor’.

In the first display of raw emotion from Australia’s most powerful Catholic, Pell choked up and stopped talking momentarily when speaking about a meeting with victims that followed his testimony to the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

Pell responded during the TV interview with News Corp Australia columnist Andrew Bolt to claims that he appears unmoved or unsympathetic to victims.

“The fact that somebody seems a bit wooden doesn’t mean they aren’t feeling anything inside,” he said. “I found the meeting emotional, but I am a bit buttoned up. That was how I was trained.”

Pell spoke about his “deeply moving” reconciliation with David Ridsdale, the nephew of notorious paedophile priest Gerald Ridsdale, who has accused Pell of bribing him not to go to police.

“I’m a friend of David Ridsdale and I have always been,” Pell said. “I regret … the misunderstanding with him and the way it’s been fought out publicly.”

“There is a grief when you are in public controversy with someone you obviously like.”

He admitted to feeling scared before the meeting with victims that it would become an ugly confrontation.

“I didn’t want a punch-up that made things worse for the church and for them,” he said.

Pell said paedophilia was a broader societal issue, but admitted there had been a “disproportionate amount” within the Catholic church in the past. “We have to plead guilty to that,” he said.

He said failure to protect children from paedophiles within the church in both Melbourne and Ballarat was “colossal failure of leadership” by those above him but excused himself as having no “real power” or knowledge at the time to act.

Pell also addressed the most controversial moment of the four day hearing where he said the “sad story” of abuse by Ridsdale “wasn’t of much interest” to him when he first heard it.

In a convoluted explanation of the “bad slip”, Pell said that in the 1990s, after he had left Ballarat, he “never liked reading in detail about these matters”.

“Things that were professionally necessary to know, I was completely ready to study them,” he said. “To suggest from that bad slip that I was somehow uninterested in the issue is completely contradicted by the whole of my life.”

Pell said he was viewed as an “evil, insensitive stereotype” and a “hate figure” but would not resign because it would be taken as an admission of guilt. Although, he said he would have to tender his resignation anyway when he turns 75 in June because of church protocol. His resignation may not be accepted.

In other revelations during Bolt’s one-hour interview, broadcast live from Rome on Sky News, Pell said he hopes to return to Australia again but not on a long haul flight because he has collapsed twice after such trips.

“I’ve had a pace maker fitted and angioplasty, both provoked by travel to Australia,” he said.

He also denied Victorian Premier at the time, Jeff Kennett, pushed him to set up an inquiry process into child sexual abuse, saying he already had the idea of a commission.

It was the Cardinal’s first interview since he completed four days of testimony to the commission.

Bolt has been a long-time defender of Pell and last month argued Pell was the victim of “one of the most vicious witch hunts to disgrace this country”.

But Bolt this week penned a piece in which he wrote that Australia’s most powerful Catholic was either a liar or “just dangerously indifferent to his responsibilities.”

It followed Pell’s testimony on Tuesday about when he learnt of the offending of notorious paedophile priest Gerald Ridsdale. “It’s a sad story and it wasn’t of much interest to me,” Pell said, prompting audible gasps.

Those words “will stain his reputation forever”, Bolt wrote in an apparent backflip. However, Bolt followed up with a piece in which he retreated from his criticism.

The Sydney Morning Herald

 

Why passports only come in four standard colours

Passports only come in four standard colours. Photo: Ross DuncanThey’re a fact of life for travellers, and only considered at the airport or when they’re lost, but have you ever considered why passports look the way they do?
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Passport colours are limited to red, green, blue and black but there’s in fact huge variety in shades, each chosen for a reason, according to BusinessInsider.

The passports for countries within the European Union tend to be burgundy, due to their communist past, said Hrant Boghossian, the vice president of Arton Group which runs the Passport Index.

Carribean countries tend to choose blue, along with the Americas and Pacific countries, as a symbol of the New World, he said.

In Muslim countries including Morocco, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia, their passports are different shades of green, believed to have been a favourite colour of the Prophet Muhammad.

New Zealand’s passport is black despite being part of Oceania.

Countries wishing to stand out, such as Switzerland and Singapore, choose a bright shade.

The US passport has seen several changes in colour, from red and green to the current blue.

Hidden artwork features in several, including those of Canada, Britain, the US, China and Norway, while Finland’s has a moose at the bottom of its pages which appears to run when the pages are flipped.

But ultimately, the colour is decided by practicalities.

“Passport production is a highly controlled process, and only few companies around the world are doing it,” Boghossian said.

Stuff

See also: The world’s best passports for travellers named

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

 

Sydney University ‘lost’ computer containing sensitive student information

The University of Sydney has alerted NSW Police about the potential privacy breach. Photo: Fiona MorrisNSW urged to ‘take the lead’ on privacy laws
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The University of Sydney has admitted it “lost” a notebook computer containing sensitive information about students using disability support services, in a major privacy breach that has shocked and angered students.

As the Baird government is urged to tackle privacy law reform, the university warned on Friday it could not “absolutely guarantee the security” of a confidential database containing students’ names, dates of birth, contact details and disability diagnoses.

A notebook computer containing the Disability Assist Database was “lost in transit” on Monday night, students were told in an email.

While the computer was password protected, it was “possible that the database could be inappropriately and unlawfully accessed”.

The NSW Police had been alerted and an internal investigation is underway.

The extraordinary slip-up came to light a day after a multi-party parliamentary committee urged the state government to “lead the way” in Australia and pass new laws allowing people to sue for damages for serious invasions of privacy.

This would include inadvertent privacy breaches committed by governments and corporations.

A furious student told Fairfax Media: “It’s bad enough I have a condition that requires me to use the university’s disability services, but it’s worse that the uni could be so careless as to risk that information getting into the wrong hands.”

The university’s director of student support services, Jordi Austin, said in the email to students the university was “deeply sorry” and was “treating this event with the utmost seriousness”.

The university had “immediately [adopted] a range of additional procedures to further secure student data ahead of a wider review”.

An internal investigation would “result in further changes to procedures to prevent such an incident from happening again”. All affected students would be contacted once the investigation was complete.

A report was being prepared for the Privacy Commissioner and students had been informed of their right to make a complaint to the university’s privacy officer.

Upper house Greens MP David Shoebridge, a member of the parliamentary committee which recommended a raft of new privacy laws, said it “beggars belief that the university would include such sensitive data on a laptop” and the incident “confirms why we need fresh privacy laws”.

“It is hard to imagine much more personal data than details of a student’s disability,” Mr Shoebridge said.

“This is the very kind of negligent action that should be the subject of a new action founded on privacy.”

Under the committee’s proposal, people could sue for damages for invasion of privacy if they had a “reasonable expectation of privacy” in the circumstances and the invasion was “serious”. There is a public interest-style test designed to limit incursions on freedom of speech.

In most cases, the invasion of privacy would need to be intentional or reckless. But in the case of government agencies or companies that might release confidential data inadvertently, negligence would be sufficient. The latter proposal has attracted some criticism from legal experts.

The University of Sydney declined to comment on how many students may have been affected by the incident.

But in a statement to Fairfax Media, the university said it had “reviewed and tightened our protocols relating to our control of laptops and implemented other data control precautions and policies. We need to avoid giving specific details of security arrangements which might aid future attacks”.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

 

Davis Cup 2016, Australia v US: Tomic, Isner win, tie locked at 1-1Photos

Davis Cup 2016, Australia v US: Tomic, Isner win, tie locked at 1-1 | Photos Fans show their support during the Davis Cup tie between Australia and the United States at Kooyong on March 4. Pictures: GETTY IMAGES
Nanjing Night Net

Australian captain Lleyton Hewitt encourages Sam Groth in his match against United State’s John Isner during the Davis Cup tie between Australia and the United States at Kooyong in Melbourne. Pictures: GETTY IMAGES

Sam Groth of Australia plays a forehand volley in his match against John Isner of the United States during the Davis Cup tie.

Aussie fans show their support during the Davis Cup match against the United States.

Sam Groth of Australia plays a backhand volley in his match against John Isner of the United States.

Sam Groth plays a backhand volley in his match against John Isner.

Jack Sock of the United States plays a forehand during his match against Australian Bernard Tomic during the Davis Cup tie on March 4.

Australian Sam Groth in action against United States’ John Isner.

Australian Sam Groth in action against United States’ John Isner.

John Isner of the United States plays a backhand in his match against Aussie Sam Groth during the Davis Cup tie between Australia and the United States at Kooyong on March 4.

Bernard Tomic of Australia plays a forehand in his match against Jack Sock of the United States.

Australian Sam Groth serves during the Davis Cup tie between Australia and the United States.

Aussie Sam Groth works up a sweat in his match against US’s John Isner on Friday.

Jack Sock of the United States gestures in his match against Australian Bernard Tomic.

John Isner of the United States serves in his match against Sam Groth of Australia.

Sam Groth of Australia serves.

John Isner of the United States shakes hands with Sam Groth of Australia after a win.

Bernard Tomic of Australia plays a forehand volley in his match against Jack Sock of the United States during the Davis Cup tie between Australia and the United States.

United States’ John Isner celebrates after winning his match against Aussie Sam Groth.

Jack Sock of the United States plays a backhand during the Davis Cup tie in Melbourne on Friday.

Australian Bernard Tomic plays a backhand in his match against Jack Sock of the United States.

Australian coach Jason Stoltenberg congratulates Bernard Tomic after his win over Jack Sock of the United States.

Australian captain Lleyton Hewitt encourages Bernard Tomic.

Jack Sock slips over during his match against Bernard Tomic.

Jack Sock plays a backhand during his match against Bernard Tomic.

Bernard Tomic of Australia is congratulated by captain Lleyton Hewitt after winning his match against Jack Sock of the United States during the Davis Cup tie.

United States captain Jim Courier congratulates Aussie Bernard Tomic after his win over Jack Sock.

Bernard Tomic of Australia celebrates winning his match against Jack Sock of the United States.

Aussie Bernard Tomic is congratulated by team-mates after winning his match against Jack Sock.

Australian Sam Groth plays a backhand in his match against John Isner of the United States.

Aussie Bernard Tomic reacts in his match against Jack Sock.

Jack Sock of the United States plays a forehand in his match against Aussie Bernard Tomic.

Aussie Bernard Tomic plays a backhand in his match against United States’ Jack Sock.

Jack Sock of the United States plays a backhand.

Jack Sock plays a forehand in his match against Bernard Tomic during the Davis Cup tie on March 4 in Melbourne.

Australian Bernard Tomic plays a backhand against Jack Sock.

Australian Bernard Tomic plays a backhand against Jack Sock.

Australian Bernard Tomic plays a forehand against Jack Sock.

Australian Bernard Tomic plays a forehand against Jack Sock.

Aussie captain Lleyton Hewitt talks to Sam Groth during his match against John Isner of the United States.

Australian Bernard Tomic serves against Jack Sock of the United States during the Davis Cup tie on Friday.

Jack Sock of the United States bites on his towel during his match against Bernard Tomic of Australia.

United States captain Jim Courier helps John Isner cool down during his match against Sam Groth of Australia.

Australian captain Lleyton Hewitt reacts as Bernard Tomic of Australia plays against Jack Sock of the United States during the Davis Cup tie.

United States captain Jim Courier shakes hands with John Isner after he won his match against Sam Groth of Australia.

John Isner of the United States celebrates winning match point in his match against Sam Groth of Australia during the Davis Cup tie.

Lleyton Hewitt captain of Australia reacts during the Davis Cup tie between Australia and the United States at Kooyong on March 4.

United States captain Jim Courier reacts as John Isner of the United States wins the first set in his match against Sam Groth of Australia during the Davis Cup tie on Friday.

John Isner of the United States plays a backhand in his match against Sam Groth of Australia.

John Isner of the United States reacts in his match against Sam Groth of Australia.

Australian Sam Groth reacts in his match against John Isner of the United States during the Davis Cup tie.

Sam Groth of Australia lets go of the racket as he plays a backhand in his match against John Isner of the United States during the Davis Cup tie.

Australian Sam Groth plays a backhand in his match against John Isner of the United States.

Australian Sam Groth plays a backhand in his match against John Isner of the United States.

Sam Groth plays a forehand volley against John Isner during the Davis Cup tie between Australia and the United States at Kooyong in Melbourne.

TweetFacebookBERNARD Tomic cannot recall everything Lleyton Hewitt was telling him at the changeovers late in a tense, draining four-set Davis Cup win over American Jack Sock that the Australian has hailed as among his most satisfying.

But Tomic does know that Hewitt was saying “the right things” to keep him positive and motivated during a challenging time against a player he had never beaten.

Tomic was struggling after a concentration lapse in the third set that carried over into the fourth, his team trailing 1-0 after Sam Groth’s loss to John Isner.

In the context of the first-round tie, and Australia’s chances in it, the singlesNo.1 simply could not lose against the US No. 2.

Tomicwon, 7-6 (7-2), 6-3, 3-6, 6-4, and so the first-round tie stands at 1-1 ahead of Saturday’s doubles.

“Both matches today probably went to plan on rankings and on form, but the Bryans are obviously the favourites tomorrow in the doubles,” Hewitt said later.

“But I still think our guys have got a good shot at it. Then on the last day anything can happen. It’s going to be live going into the last day after today, which is nice.”

Just as it was immensefor Tomic, who is ranked four places higher than No.24 Sock despite not having beaten him in three previous attempts.

But the last was in 2014, and Tomic has been playing the best tennis of his career, with 13 wins from 19 matches this season, including a finals appearance in Acapulco last Sunday.

The flipside was that meant a long journey back from Mexico for a Tuesday arrival at Kooyong and and delayed grasscourt practicefor a player whose responsibilities increased when Nick Kyrgios was declared unfit to play.

But he loves the surface and the team environment, and continues to mature as a big-match player, his impressive Davis Cup record now 16-3.

“It’s an amazing feeling. So tough out here, the conditions were so hot and I was trying to get used to it as much as I could,” Tomic said.

“It’s been tough for me the last few days, coming on grass, so it’s not so easy and I’m just happy to have the chance first time having Lleyton there by my side means a lot to me.I had a surface to play him on which was in my favour, but I knew it was gonna be tough, so I’m happy I won in the end.”

To Hewitt, who has played so many, lulls are inevitable in best-of-five set matches.

“It’s how you respond to that and he found a way in the fourth set,” the veteran said.

“It’s not an easy thing to do, to come out when you’re the number one player for your country and you’re 1-0 down in Davis Cup, in aworld group match and Bernie did fantastic today and he’s done absolutely everything we asked of him all week.”

With more to come, notably a live reverse singles against John Isner on Sunday, against whom he also has a losing record:0-1.

The world No.11 squeezed out of a tight first set against Groth, havingbeen down0-40 in the fifth game, but broke in the first game of the second andgrew in confidence thereafter.

He served well, of course, he did, but it was also his return game that impressed.

Groth agreed that the first set was crucial, “especially the way we both play. We both play on a little bit of confidence, both play behind our serve and especially on a day when it’s quite hot out there as well.Had I have maybe taken a chance that 0-40 game early, maybe it’s a different story, but I felt like after that he hit that backhand winner that clipped the line in the tiebreak and then his confidence just seemed to build. He started taking cuts on returns and to his credit they started going in.

“Everyone thinks of John as a big server; the guy’s 11 in the world. he’s a quality player. I maybe didn’t expect him to hit as many lines as he did, but that’s the reality of it today – he returned well and got on top and got confident and was hard to stop.”

The Age

 

The week in picturesPhotos

The week in pictures | Photos WOLLONGONG: People swim at North Wollongong beach. Coastal temps of 30 degrees or above were felt on seven days during summer. Photo: ADAM MCLEAN
Nanjing Night Net

NURIOOTPA: Teusner Wines vintage crew Bryce Conway, Courtney Neray, Peter Reiters and Simon Both take a break. Photo: CARLA WIESE-SMITH

ANGASTON: Angaston Yalumba Winery viticulturist Brooke Howell was recently labelled Silver Young Organic Leader. Photo: LAURA ECKERT.

ARARAT: Alice Culling has won a swag of medals at national titles. Photo: PAUL CARRACHER.

ARARAT: Kwame Tosuma performing with Sanofka. Photo: PAUL CARRACHER.

ARARAT: Rita Fokio, Mohamed Camara, Kwame Tosuma performing with Sanofka. Photo: PAUL CARRACHER

ARARAT: Ronald Menash performing with Sanofka. Photo: PAUL CARRACHER

BATEMANS BAY: Mogo Local Aboriginal Land Council environmental rangers Sherrie Nye and Adam Nye set traps for the European green shore crabs. Photo: JUSTIN GILLIGAN from Marine Parks

BATEMANS BAY: Peter Bashford in his Batehaven workshop where he turns timber into time pieces.

BATEMANS BAY: The Batemans Bay High school staff and students try the new beach chairs in the water.

BEAUDESERT: Local icon Joy Drescher will not fight for a seat at the Scenic Rim Regional Council for the first time since 1979.

BEGA: The Greens’ Senator Lee Rhiannon, Eden-Monaro candidate Tamara Ryan and forestry spokesperson David Shoebridge welcome the new flora reserves.

BEGA: The Somedays’ Alec Mitchell and Mark Maranion take the stage at the Cobargo Folk Festival on Sunday afternoon. Photo: ALBERT MCKNIGHT

BENDIGO: Bendigo seems to have a large number of men’s barber shops. Barber David Chiswell works on Peter Palychronopoulos. Photo: DARREN HOWE

BENDIGO: Fashion Designer, Linda Jackson. Photo: GLENN DANIELS

BENDIGO: John Galliford and Andrea Galliford from Canberra, enjoying some of the sights oof Bendigo during their 3 day stay. Photo: DARREN HOWE

BENDIGO: Marilyn at sunset. Photo: NONI HYETT

BENDIGO: Promo for comic book fair. Kara Harris, Sec Dalek and Darren Hutchesson Photo: GLENN DANIELS

BENDIGO: Teddy Bears Picnic for Grade Preps at Spring Gully Primary School.Maya Dean, Arlie Koburn and Archie Burke. Photo: NONI HYETT

BENDIGO: UPF Anti Mosque Rally, Photo: DARREN HOWE

BENDIGO: Young trainer Mark Giddings has a dog Lioness Lulu in this Saturday’s Australian Cup final. Photo: GLENN DANIELS

BENDIGO: Inside The Brick Lego exhibition. Spiderman, aka Chris Hiddins, examines his lego likeness. Photo: DARREN HOWE

BATHURST: BMX competitors Sierra Ebert, Tykira Yuke and Cody Yuke say they have been very impressed with Bathurst’s new $1.5 million track. They are in town for this week’s BMX national titles. Photo: PHILL MURRAY

BLAYNEY: Carlie Fee on Dirty Deeds and Jazz Johnston on Bob. Photo: PHIL BLATCH

BLAYNEY: Kasey Wallace, 6, at Blayney Show. Photo: PHIL BLATCH.

BLAYNEY: Lola Jennings and Pegasus at Blayney Show. Photo: PHIL BLATCH

BLAYNEY: Matt Fletchers’ Digger in action in yard dog trials at Blayney Show. Photo: PHIL BLATCH.

BLAYNEY: Showgirl winner Annika Brown. Photo: PHIL BLATCH.

BOOBOROWIE: It was almost a slip and a grip from Clare’s Brad Davy at the inaugural Booborowie lawnmower race, with Luke Earle watching on as he flies past.

CESSNOCK: Brokenwood Wines wine club assistant Sophie Ceccato during the staff pick at the vineyard.

CESSNOCK: Millfield truck driver John Bridge has been inducted into the National Transport Hall of Fame for his 46 years’ service to the industry

CESSNOCK: The #letthemstay banner was displayed by Nicola Scaife of Balloon Aloft on February 20

DUBBO: A collection of trained birds of prey has begun nightly patrols of downtown Macquarie Street, which feral starlings in their masses have made their own each autumn. Photo: BELINDA SOOLE

DUNGOG: Chook the Dungog magpie has hit social media. Photo: Belinda-Jane Davis

DUBBO: In what she has described as the most exciting time of her life, former Dubbo College student Thalia Smith will take to the stage across Australia in the smash hit musical We Will Rock You, based on the songs of Queen.

HEBEL: Jack Johnston is looking forward to sending his wool to market this year. Photo: ANDREA CROTHERS

HORSHAM: Connor Jones, Nhill College, Black Ranges Division primary school swimming championships at Horsham Aquatic Centre. Photo: PAUL CARRACHER

HORSHAM: Edward Hausler, St Mary’s, Warracknabeal, Black Ranges Division primary school swimming championships. Photo: PAUL CARRACHER.

HORSHAM: Macey, Bart and Robyn Turgoose with a baby eastern brown snake their cat Dixie caught. Photo: PAUL CARRACHER

HORSHAM: Perry Demoltions pulling down Horsham Church of Christ. Photo: PAUL CARRACHER

KIAMA: Kiama-based performers Sean Emmett, Lincoln John Piper and Doug Faulkner. Photo: ADAM MCLEAN

KIAMA: Sharon Sutherland will undertake a gruelling physical challenge to raise funds for charity. Photo: ADAM MCLEAN

LAUNCESTON: Janalli Kaine takes a tumble in Junior Steer Ride at Powranna Rodeo. Photo: GEOFF ROBSON, The Examiner

LAUNCESTON: Prospect pooch Millie made headlines when she gave birth to 20 puppies. Photo: PHILLIP BIGGS, The Examiner

MILTON: John Payne judges some of the wines that have been presented for judging.

MUSWELLBROOK: Sister Dorothy and Matt McLaren revisiting their lessons. This is the same piano from his childhood lessons. Photo: Betina Hughes

NAROOMA: Paul Mayer from Team Jigman caught this 78cm flathead just off the main channel on Sunday morning helping get second place in the 2016 Narooma Flathead Challenge.

NEWCASTLE: The Pacific Aria approaches Nobbys on Tuesday morning. Photo: DAREEN PATEMAN

NEWCASTLE: University of Newcastle student Kali Sunshine Barcala felt the term artist had been ‘cast aside’ as the university abolished its Bachelor of Fine Arts. Photo: SIMONE DE PEAK

NEWCASTLE: Ruby Robinson (centre left, with flower wreath) celebrates her 11th birthday in a stretch Hummer on Saturday. Photo: MARINA NEIL

NOWRA: Fruitbat numbers are down on the South Coast.

NOWRA: Fruitbat numbers are down on the South Coast

NOWRA: The Shoalhaven Hockey under 18 continued its good start to the Illawarra season with another strong win over Kiama.

NURIOOTPA: Peter Reiters went along with the Barossa Herald’s messy plan. Photo: CARLA WIESE-SMITH

NURIOOTPAL: Courtney Neray went along with the Barossa Herald’s messy plan. Photo: CARLA WIESE-SMITH

PENRITH: A member of the Slovakian contingent practices for the Rio Olympics at the Penrith Whitewater Stadium. Photo: KRYSTYNA POLLARD

SCONE: Golden Fleece Warriors captain Josh Noble and Rouchel’s Nate Atkinson at Bill Rose Sports Complex ahead of Saturday’s A grade decider. Photo: BEN MURPHY

SINGLETON: Singleton Heights Pre-School readying their garden for the annual Tidy Towns Garden Competition. Photo: SHANNON DANN

ULLADULLA: Emily Higgans with Candy after winning first prize in the pony club mount.

WOLLONGONG: A car on fire at Woonona has spread smoke across Memorial Drive.

WOLLONGONG: Riders Against Discrimination Phillip Miller, Peter Holm, Jono Hyratt, Glen Carn, Sharon Parkes, Greg Jenkins and Carla Jenkins. Photo: ADAM MCLEAN.

WOLLONGONG: The recent loss of 500 jobs at BlueScope left a $400 million hole in the regional economy, according to a study commissioned by Wollongong City Council.

TweetFacebookThe best snaps this week from Fairfax Media’s photographers across Australia.

 

New direction in 34-year-old plane mysteryInteractive map

ALAN Weller clearly remembers the stormy evening in 1981 when a Cessna 210 nearly ploughed into his farmhouse at Mt George.
Nanjing Night Net

The night of August 9, 1981 was noteworthy alone for its terrible weather, with powerful gusts of wind and low, black clouds creating sleety, icy cold conditions throughout the Manning Valley and Gloucester areas.

Alan and his wife Lucy, who have lived at their farm just over the Tiri Bridge for 52 years, were readying for bed when they heard the tell-tale buzz of an approaching aircraft.

“We could hear it before we could see it,” Alan recalled.

Guy Watts, Alan Weller, Kelvin Gregory and John Ritchie look out towards the ridge that was the potential exit from the valley for VH-MDX.

He dashed outside to see the single-engine Cessna no more than 20 metres above the rolling hillsidethat house is perched on, battling against the gale.

“I was scared it was going to hit the house, it was that low,” Alan said.

In shock and disbelief Alan watched as the plane continued deeper into the Mt George valley he and numerous other farmers call home.

It’s the latest contribution to the mystery surrounding VH-MDX that, after 34 years, continues to deepen.

Alan says he has told his story to police and media multiple times over the past three decades, but according to him, the pleas for a redirected search have fallen on deaf ears.

“It was just ignored,” Alan said.

No trace of the plane has ever been found.

“I wasn’t expecting to see a bloody plane on top of my house”: Alan Weller.

It remains Australia’s only unsolved civil aviation incident.

On board the flight that night were five men – pilot Michael Hutchins, 52; Noel Wildash, 42; Rhett Bosler, 33; Philip Pembroke, 43, and senior Sydney Water Police chief Ken Price, 54.

Four of the men had sailed on a yacht to Queensland before enlisting the services of Hutchins to fly them back to Bankstown airport, starting in Proserpine with a fuel stop in Coolangatta.

The flight was going according to plan when events hurriedly began to unravel near Taree.

The radio transmissions between Hutchins and the Sydney Air Traffic Control paint a picture of the flight spiraling out of control over a 15 minute period.

At. 7.24 Hutchins radioed control requesting permission to ascend to 10,000 feet to escape turbulence.

Seconds later he radioed again saying that the automatic horizon and the direction indicator, two crucial navigation tools, had failed.

Ten minutes after his initial call Hutchins said the aircraft was picking up ice and was losing altitude at 1000ft a minute.

Alan WellerI heard this noise, I’ve looked up and seen this little plane battling

Kelvin GregoryThe red line shows the route the plane could have taken towards the suggested crash site.

TweetFacebook MapsPotential route of the downed planeDespite going back to that stretch of the Nowendoc Road near McQueen’s Bridge, the two could never agree on the exact location of the light.

Previous searches have been based upon the assumption that the plane crashed shortly after the final radio transmission was received at 7.39pm.

John’s accounts lend more weight to the theory that the plane could have flown through the farmers’ valley, over the ridge and the Khatambuhl Valley, before crashing near McQueen’s Bridge.

The new site is more than 50km north east of the Barrington Tops where past searches have been focused.

If Alan’s initial sighting was closer to 8pm, it also means that the plane may have continued to fly some time after the final recorded transmission at 7.39pm, with the loss of radio contact attributable to the plane flying well below the mountains hemming it in on either side.

It’s why they all believe a search in the new area is critical.

“It’s never been searched here at all,” John said about the area along the Nowendoc Road.

Given the lack of success with the traditional search areas, all the men are hoping that their first-hand experiences can provide a new direction to the mystery.

“We all live in the same area, we’re the same mould, we saw the same thing,” Kelvin said.

“We’re not pulling anyone’s leg.”

Port Macquarie News

 

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