苏州姑苏区美甲培训

苏州美甲美睫培训学校

July, 2019

Smaller apartments don’t mean lower quality: Tony Trobe interviews Rebecca Stockley

Tony Trobe interviews on the strengths and weaknesses of small apartments. Photo: Melissa AdamsTony Trobe talks to Rebecca Stockley, ACT Planning Institute of Australia committee member, about apartment design.
Nanjing Night Net

TT: Recently there has been heated debate about the inconsistent quality of apartment design. Is this a planning issue?

RS: Planning is inherently concerned with the quality of the environment and the manner in which people interact with it. Housing is fundamental to the quality of that interaction. It is therefore reasonable the planning system seeks to promote an acceptable quality in all housing developments, including apartments.

TT: Is the plethora of very small apartments now on the market a reflection of a race to the bottom?

RS: You have to distinguish between the size of the apartment and the quality of that apartment, in terms of both internal design and construction quality. Construction quality is ultimately a question for building certifiers, so I won’t comment on that.

The rate of delivery of smaller apartments in recent years should be considered against market demand, housing diversity and housing affordability. Ultimately, developers will build whatever sells. For a variety of reasons the investor market has been very strong in recent years and smaller apartments appeal to that market. Historically, housing delivery has been heavily skewed towards detached housing on larger blocks. This no longer marries with demographic patterns, while housing affordability is a deepening issue. The delivery of a higher proportion of smaller housing topologies, including apartments, reflects this.

I don’t think it is helpful to criticise small apartments per se.  However, I think there are opportunities to increase the design quality of small apartments, to improve the way they function, and to address some of the less obvious design features that contribute to a quality environment.

TT: In overseas markets,is there a bigger range of innovative housing topologies with small or very small footprints?

RS: Yes, but that also reflects pressures associated with land availability and cost. The Territory Plan goes some way to mediate ACT community expectations with potential future innovations in design by specifying minimum dwelling floor areas, which exclude balconies and car parking facilities, but also providing the opportunity for the decision maker to consider the details of the internal layout (including functional living spaces, flexibility in furniture layout, adequate storage and service areas, and the availability of shared facilities) when considering designs that do not meet the minimum dwelling floor thresholds.

This approach is sensible in most instances, but could benefit from clearer recognition of the value in innovation and design excellence, irrespective of apartment size. At present there is no detailed guidance to assist the developer or decision maker when considering what might not be an appropriate design, nor does it highlight what design attributes the community might value, or be willing to trade off for other attributes, such as a high level of accessibility to services or sustainability.

TT: Are we dragging the chain compared to other jurisdictions dealing with the similar issues?

RS: In early 2015, Victoria commenced work towards a Better Apartment Design framework. As part of that discussion, industry demonstrated you could achieve high quality and flexible design within small spaces; consequently the government appears to have stepped away from the idea of minimum apartment sizes. However, there is likely to be stronger guidance on the less tangible aspects of good dwelling design, including access to natural light and ventilation, ceiling heights, noise and adaptability, that will improve a person’s enjoyment of their living environment over the longer term.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

 

MARDI GRAS SYDNEY: A look at the historyPhotos

MARDI GRAS SYDNEY: A look at the history | Photos 2016: Brendan Spratt, a performer Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras rehearses his routines. Photo: COLE BENNETTS
Nanjing Night Net

1978: Protesters take part in the 1978 protest that would evolve into the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras. Photo SMH

1978: The scene outside of the Central Court of Petty Session in Sydney

1980s: An image from a parade in the 1980s

1986: Oxford Street celebrates the gay and lesbian mardi gras. Photo FAIRFAX ARCHIVE, SMH

1988: Parade spectators climb atop Oxford St shop awnings to watch the parade. Photo: GARY MCLEAN / FAIRFAX ARCHIVES

1998: Drag queens dressed as ‘The Bond Girls’ during the 20th Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras parade in Sydney. Photo: TORSTEN BLACKWOOD / AFP / GETTY IMAGES

1999: The 22nd Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras parade. Photo: TORSTEN BLACKWOOD / AFP / Getty Images

1999: Vanessa Wagner performed during the festival at the Seymour Theatre.

2001: Australian gays perform Mardi Gras dances during the Centenary of Federation parade through the streets of Sydney. Photo: TORSTEN BLACKWOOD / AFP / Getty Images

2001: Australian politician Phillip Ruddock and Australian Prime Minister John Howardcome under scrutiny by having cutouts of their faces displayed. Photo: NICK LAHAM

2002: Spectators at the parade. Photo: PATRICK RIVIERE

2004: An image from the annual parade. Photo JON BUCKLE

2004: An image from the annual parade. Photo JON BUCKLE

2005: Parade Goers dressed as Prince Charles and Camilla pose for photographers. Photo: CHRIS MCGRATH / GETTY IMAGES

2006: Mardi Gras parade

2007: The bring david hicks home float. Photo: JAMES BRICKWOOD

2009: This pic shows Lardonna Rama. Photo: JAME ALCOCK

2010: Parade goers dancing in Oxford Street

2011: Launch of new Sydney mardi gras promotional logo. Photo: Robert McGrath.

2011. Photo: GLEN DRAPER

2012: Kylie Minogue greets the dancers after watching a tribute performance in her honour in Taylor Square during the Mardi Gras parade in Sydney. Photo: JANIE BARRETT

2013: Revellers enjoy the Mardi Gras in Sydney. Photo: JAMES ALCOCK

2014: ANZ dressed up some of their ATM’s around Sydney for Mardi Gras. Photo: SASHA WOOLEY

2015. Jessica Mauboy performs during Mardi Gras Party at the Entertainment Quarter. Photo: DON ARNOLD

2015: Australian Defence Force members and supporters march in the 2015 Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras parade

2015: Participants and party goers at the Mardi Gras. Photo: JAME ALCOCK

2015: Sydney lord mayor Clover Moore flies the flag at this year’s Mardi Gras parade. Photo: JAMES ALCOCK

TweetFacebookPHOTOS: 2014 Mega GalleryPHOTOS: A look back in time at the 2002 Mardi Gras2013:Mardi Gras still breaks down barriers after 35 yearsEverybody loves a parade, and the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras is one of the biggest and best, not only in Australia, but in the world.

From humble beginnings back in June 24, 1978, what was once a small scale protest and statement of pride and self-expressionis now a major mainstream national icon that is internationally respected as a celebration of diversity and inclusion.

As revelers gear up for Saturday’s 2016 Mardi Gras parade in Sydney we take a look at the event that started in confrontation back in 1978.

The first march took place on Saturday, June 241978 at 10pm. The march wasmet with unexpected police violence after 53 men and women were violently arrested by police.

Up to 3,000 people marched in an incident-free parade in 1979 after the NSW governmentrepealed the NSW Summary Offences Act legislation that had allowed the arrests to be made and created a new Public Assemblies Act which meant that Sydneysiders no longer had to apply for a permit to have a demonstration. They just had to notify police.

In 1980 a key new element was introduced – the post-parade party. In 1981 the decision was taken to move the event forward to summer to enjoy better weather.

The estimates for the parade audiences show it doubling every year till it reached 50,000 in 1984.

The event began to enjoy extensive media coverage from the mid-80s onwards and the crowds continued to swell, from 200,000 in 1989 to over 500,000 in 1993.

Large numbers of interstate and international travellers had started flying in for the event as well, generating an estimated $38 million for the NSW economy.

Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras remains the one truly global gay annual event and a uniquely attractive escape from the Northern Hemisphere winter.

– source: mardigras.org419论坛.

 

2016 Clipsal 500 Adelaide: Scott Pye to start opening race from polePhotos

2016 Clipsal 500 Adelaide: Scott Pye to start opening race from pole | Photos Chaz Mostert, driver of the #55 Supercheap Auto Racing Ford, celebrates after taking pole position for race two after qualifying session two for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4. Pictures: GETTY IMAGES
Nanjing Night Net

Jason Bright drives the #8 Team BOC Holden during qualifying session two for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500. Pictures: GETTY IMAGES

Chaz Mostert, driver of the #55 Supercheap Auto Racing Ford, celebrates after taking pole position for race two after qualifying session two for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Mark Winterbottom drives the #1 The Bottle-O Racing Ford during qualifying session two for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500.

Chaz Mostert drives the #55 Supercheap Auto Racing Ford during qualifying session two for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500.

Craig Lowndes, driver of the #888 Team Vortex Holden, sits in his car prior to qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Craig Lowndes drives the #888 Team Vortex Holden during qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500.

Chaz Mostert drives the #55 Supercheap Auto Racing Ford during qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500.

Scott McLaughlin, driver of the #33 Wilson Security Racing GRM Volvo, sits in his car prior to qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Jamie Whincup, driver of the #88 Red Bull Racing Australia Holden, prepares for qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Craig Lowndes, driver of the #888 Team Vortex Holden, speaks with his engineer Ludo Lacroix after qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Chaz Mostert, driver of the #55 Supercheap Auto Racing Ford, is seen prior to qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Scott McLaughlin, driver of the #33 Wilson Security Racing GRM Volvo, is seen after qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Scott Pye, driver of the #17 DJR Team Penske Ford, celebrates after taking pole position for race one after qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Scott Pye, driver of the #17 DJR Team Penske Ford, celebrates after taking pole position for race one after qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Scott Pye, driver of the #17 DJR Team Penske Ford, celebrates after taking pole position for race one after qualifying session one for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4. Pictures: GETTY IMAGES

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4. Pictures: GETTY IMAGES

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

Practice for the V8 Supercars Clipsal 500 at Adelaide Street Circuit on March 4.

TweetFacebookScott Pye has stunned the V8 Supercars field to snatch pole position for the opening race at the Clipsal 500.

The No.17 Falcon has edged out Jamie Whincup by less than a tenth a second and will lead the field in Saturday’s first race of the season.

The pole is Pye’s first in 106 races in the category, and gives a first pole to DJR Team Penske since joining the series at last year’s Clipsal 500.

With new teammate Fabian Coulthard, Pye had endured an off-season in transition as his team expanded to field two cars this year.

The hard work appears to have paid off, with the Roger Penske-backed outfit looking set to compete hard in 2016.

Pye’s garage were euphoric at the result, and the 26-year-old pumped his fists to the Adelaide crowd on Friday after climbing from his Falcon.

“It’s a big relief after a massive off-season,” he said.

This time 12 months ago, DJR Team Penske debuted returning champion Marcos Ambrose in the No.17 Falcon but the Tasmanian didn’t last another race before giving up his drive to Pye.

Team president Tim Cindric said it was a reward for the hard work of both the driver and his engineering team.

“It’s a great start for the season … obviously, we have a lot of work to do,” he said.

“It shows we’re in a better place than we started last year and, hopefully, we can build on it.”

The second row of the grid will be filled by Scott McLaughlin, who was quickest in both practice sessions on Friday, with series champion Mark Winterbottom fourth.

The Sydney Morning Herald

 

NRL 2016: Action from Round 1 – Thursday, FridayPhotos, Video

NRL 2016: Action from Round 1 – Thursday, Friday | Photos, Video Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE
Nanjing Night Net

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

Brisbane’s 2016 campaign is off to a winning start with a 17-4 win over Parramatta who also lost playmaker Corey Norman to injury. Photo: GETTY IMAGES / MARK KOLBE

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

The Manly Sea Eagles have suffered a 28-6 defeat to the Bulldogs at Brookvale in Trent Barrett’s first NRL game as head coach. Photo: MATT KING / GETTY IMAGES

TweetFacebookThe NRL season kicked off on Thursday, March 3, with a game between the Parramatta Eels and the Brisbane Broncos.

The Broncos took home the points with a 17 to 4 win over the Eels.

The first round of 2016 continued on Friday night when the Canterbury Bulldogs took on the Manly Sea Eagles.

It was the Bulldogs who took the victory with a 28 to 6 win over the Sea Eagles.

 

Cardinal George Pell says resigning would be an admission of guilt

Cardinal George Pell reads a statement after meeting with abuse survivors in Rome this week. Photo: Marco Di Lauro Cardinal George Pell giving evidence via video link from Rome.
Nanjing Night Net

Unheard survivors reach out en masse’We met as people from Ballarat’Comment: Pell must resign, or Pope should actBackflip on Cardinal a Bolt from the blueCardinal Pell in his own words

Cardinal George Pell has welled up in a live interview from Rome when talking about a victim of sexual abuse by a paedophile priest, but said he would not resign over the issue.

Andrew Bolt is in Rome as a ‘Sky News contributor’.

In the first display of raw emotion from Australia’s most powerful Catholic, Pell choked up and stopped talking momentarily when speaking about a meeting with victims that followed his testimony to the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

Pell responded during the TV interview with News Corp Australia columnist Andrew Bolt to claims that he appears unmoved or unsympathetic to victims.

“The fact that somebody seems a bit wooden doesn’t mean they aren’t feeling anything inside,” he said. “I found the meeting emotional, but I am a bit buttoned up. That was how I was trained.”

Pell spoke about his “deeply moving” reconciliation with David Ridsdale, the nephew of notorious paedophile priest Gerald Ridsdale, who has accused Pell of bribing him not to go to police.

“I’m a friend of David Ridsdale and I have always been,” Pell said. “I regret … the misunderstanding with him and the way it’s been fought out publicly.”

“There is a grief when you are in public controversy with someone you obviously like.”

He admitted to feeling scared before the meeting with victims that it would become an ugly confrontation.

“I didn’t want a punch-up that made things worse for the church and for them,” he said.

Pell said paedophilia was a broader societal issue, but admitted there had been a “disproportionate amount” within the Catholic church in the past. “We have to plead guilty to that,” he said.

He said failure to protect children from paedophiles within the church in both Melbourne and Ballarat was “colossal failure of leadership” by those above him but excused himself as having no “real power” or knowledge at the time to act.

Pell also addressed the most controversial moment of the four day hearing where he said the “sad story” of abuse by Ridsdale “wasn’t of much interest” to him when he first heard it.

In a convoluted explanation of the “bad slip”, Pell said that in the 1990s, after he had left Ballarat, he “never liked reading in detail about these matters”.

“Things that were professionally necessary to know, I was completely ready to study them,” he said. “To suggest from that bad slip that I was somehow uninterested in the issue is completely contradicted by the whole of my life.”

Pell said he was viewed as an “evil, insensitive stereotype” and a “hate figure” but would not resign because it would be taken as an admission of guilt. Although, he said he would have to tender his resignation anyway when he turns 75 in June because of church protocol. His resignation may not be accepted.

In other revelations during Bolt’s one-hour interview, broadcast live from Rome on Sky News, Pell said he hopes to return to Australia again but not on a long haul flight because he has collapsed twice after such trips.

“I’ve had a pace maker fitted and angioplasty, both provoked by travel to Australia,” he said.

He also denied Victorian Premier at the time, Jeff Kennett, pushed him to set up an inquiry process into child sexual abuse, saying he already had the idea of a commission.

It was the Cardinal’s first interview since he completed four days of testimony to the commission.

Bolt has been a long-time defender of Pell and last month argued Pell was the victim of “one of the most vicious witch hunts to disgrace this country”.

But Bolt this week penned a piece in which he wrote that Australia’s most powerful Catholic was either a liar or “just dangerously indifferent to his responsibilities.”

It followed Pell’s testimony on Tuesday about when he learnt of the offending of notorious paedophile priest Gerald Ridsdale. “It’s a sad story and it wasn’t of much interest to me,” Pell said, prompting audible gasps.

Those words “will stain his reputation forever”, Bolt wrote in an apparent backflip. However, Bolt followed up with a piece in which he retreated from his criticism.

The Sydney Morning Herald